Minneapolis Homicides 2012-2016

This page contains maps displaying Minneapolis homicides from 2012 to 2016. The homicides have been plotted along with other variables that correlate with homicide location. The Center hopes that these maps will inform the reader of the variables that can lead to a higher concentration of homicides.

 

Homicides Compared with Families Above Poverty

1) The map to the left displays the city of Minneapolis’s census tract aggregated by census data, pertaining to how many families within each tract are above the poverty level by 300%. In 2010, the poverty threshold for an individual was $11,139; for a family of four with two children it was $22,113. Areas in darker green have more families 300% above poverty level or more. Homicides have also been plotted and symbolized to inform when each murder happened. As you can see from the map, there is a high correlation between families living in or near the poverty level and homicides taking place.

 

 

Homicides Compared with Families Below Poverty

2) The map to the left displays the city of Minneapolis’s census tract aggregated by census data, pertaining to how many families within each tract are below the poverty level. Tracts of darker blue equals more families living within poverty. Homicides from 2012 – 2016 have been symbolized to correspond to the year they occurred. As you can see from the map, there is a high correlation between below poverty level families and homicides. This makes using poverty a great indicator of homicides and can be used to help resolve the issue.

 

 

Homicides per Neighborhood

3) The map to the left displays the city of Minneapolis’s census tract aggregated by census data, pertaining to how many homicides have occurred in each tract from 2012 to 2016. The homicides have also been plotted to see where they occur compared to the highly concentrated tracts.

 

 

 

 

Homicides Compared to Street Buffers

4) The map to the left displays the city of Minneapolis broken into community sections. Homicides from 2012 to 2016 have been plotted in green. Streets with a high amount of homicide incidents have been plotted as well as given a buffer of 500 feet. The total number of homicides (129) can be seen in the legend and can be compared with the number of homicides that fall within each street buffer. This gives us an idea which streets are the most dangerous. Deploying police on these streets may help resolve these homicides over time.

 

 

Homicides Compared to Police Stations

5) The map to the left displays Minneapolis broken into communities. Homicides are plotted as green dots, while police stations have been plotted as blue stars. Police stations have been given a half mile buffer and 1 mile buffer to give us further insight as to where the homicides are occurring compared to police stations. Of the 129 homicides from 2012 to 2016: 52 (40.3%) within 1/2 mile of police stations and 115 (89.1%) within 1 mile of police stations.

 

 

Homicides Compared to Churches

6) The map to the left displays Minneapolis broken into communities. Homicides are plotted as red dots while churches have been plotted in purple. Churches have been given a 500 feet buffer and a quarter mile buffer to illustrate the correlation between homicide locations and the location of churches within the city. Of the 129 homicides from 2012 to 2016: 39 (30.2%) within 500 feet of churches and 114 (88.4%) within 1/4 mile of a church. There are a total of 360 churches within Minneapolis in 2016.

 

 

Homicides Compared to Schools

7) The map to the left displays Minneapolis broken into communities. Homicides are represented as green dots and schools represented as yellow dots. Schools have been given buffers of 500 feet in white and a quarter mile buffer in tan/brown. The buffers are used to get an idea if schools have an correlation with the locations of homicides within the city. Of the 129 homicides: 21 (16.3%) are within 500 feet of schools and 77 (59.7%) are within 1/4 mile of schools.

 

 

Homicides Compared to Community Centers

8) The map to the left displays Minneapolis broken into communities. Homicides are represented as green dots and community centers or recreation centers are represented as black dots. Community centers and rec centers have been given a 500 feet buffer zone and a 1/4 mile buffer zone to distinguish any correlations between community center locations and homicide locations. Of the 129 homicides: 6 (4.7%) fall within 500 feet of community centers and 32 (24.8%) within 1/4 mile of community centers.

 

 

 

Copyright 2018: All maps have been created by the Center for Homicide Research.